Tag Archives: online

7 steps to start an online business

How I started Blogging Online

  1. choose a topic you are passionate about – this will propel the bob marleysuccess of your business especially on those days when you don’t feel like working. I chose Rastafari and Jamaican culture because I know a lot about them, and I love talking about and blogging about Jamaican and Rastafari Culture.
  2. start a free blog about it –  start a blog on wordpress.com and never leave it. WordPress.com blogs get a heap of traffic. I had a free blog on Rastafari before, but I got rid of it. I now have another blog called “jamaican love blog” on wordpress .com, It gets good traffic and I am really proud of it.
  3. start a paid blog – this is where you go to wordpress.org and set up a paid blog. wordpress.org has all the stuff a newbie needs to set up a professional self hosted blog. (More info on the next step how to do it)
  4. buy some hosting for your paid blog – I use bluehost. bluehost.com are the Rastafarian_woman_puruleaders in inexpensive quality webhosting for beginners. You can reach them 24/7. To answer all your questions about tech support and creating your first self hosted blog. Through bluehost you will set up and create your self hosted blog with your own domain name…like jamaicanlove.org or jamaicanrastafarianlove.com Go to wordpress.com and buy your domain name…then you will be all set to get a self hosted blog where you can start selling ebooks, handmade earrings, knitted scarfs, picture frames, recipes whatever you like.
  5. start driving traffic from your free blog to your paid blog – Your paid blog is where you will sell your products, eBooks, whatever you want to sell to make money because we are not allowed to sell stuff, on the WordPress.com free blog. Just their rules. So just drive the traffic there for buying.
  6. build even more traffic! – advertising (newspapers) YouTube, more blogging are some great options for getting more traffic to your paid blog. It really depends what you are blogging about, and what you are selling. Some subjects (like Rastafari ) are pretty much web only. Whereas other topics (subconscious mind training) are pretty much anywhere and everywhere. You will have to decide.
  7. 51v1uTgZojL._SX310_BO1,204,203,200_Keep blogging – With time you will be known among  the community your blog is in. People will expect you to produce “new works. ” Which is great because they will already be your customers. I now have more than 3 blogs, jamaicanrastafarianlove.com jamaicanlove.org and jamaicanloveblog.wordpress.com those are my main ones for Caribbean culture. You can also check out my work in progress subconscious-mind-training.com

If you want to write and sell books like I do. I recommend starting your blog and starting to write your first book all at the same time. That’s what I did. Then everything just snowballed on its own. Remember, choose the topic you are most passionate about, but think about all the monetization options before you begin so that you don’t get stuck and are aware of types of products you will be creating for you customers starting now.

 

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How to Cook for a Jamaican Man

How to Cook for a Jamaican Man


how to cook for a jamaican man
A Jamaican mans mind-set may be different from yours when it comes to the types of food he likes to eat and the flavors enjoys. I created this blog post to provide some tips on how to cook for your Jamaican man so that he is feeling happy and satisfied at the end of his meal! Enjoy! Here are 3 tips, just for your knowledge,  before we address what Jamaican food is best to cook for your King.

  1. Setting the Mood– If you are planning to cook some food for your Jamaican man, be sure the mood is right. Don’t have too much noise in the preferred dining area, and be sure the entire space, and more specifically his eating space is clean and clutter free. Jamaicans are very picky about cleanliness especially when and where they eat.
  2. Jamaican man Taste Buds! – Your Jamaican mans  taste buds arehow to cook for a jamaican man probably different from your own. His taste buds are used to food bursting with Caribbean flavors and Caribbean seasonings. If he was raised by a Jamaican Mother, then his intestinal tract is used to these special flavors too. When you serve your Jamaican man food, just know he expects it to taste good. If it does not taste good, he will be truly disappointed, actually his taste buds will be truly disappointed.
  3. After the Meal –Jamaicans in general like to enjoy a lot of quiet time. That is just our Culture. I find that after a meal is a time when many Jamaicans would rather not engage in too heavy conversation. After your Jamaican man eats his meal. Give him his space to digest his food, and enjoy the feeling of being satiated. He will appreciate that you thought of him in this way. If he wants to engage in conversation after he has finished his Delicious meal, allow him to be the one to initiate it with you and not the other way around.

So….What should you cook for your Jamaican man?

how to cook for a jamaican

*click the links below to get Jamaican food recipes for each!*

My top 5  Jamaican food dinner choices!

  1. Jamaican Stew Chicken – (My personal favorite Jamaican dinner) jamaican stew chicken cooking recipeJamaican stew chicken tastes like heaven in Chicken, but at the same time is light, and not too heavy. Just a great flavorful chicken meal. Click here for the Jamaican Stew Chicken Cooking Recipes
  2. Jamaican Ox Tail – Jamaican Ox tail is loved by many, especially Jamaican men. It hits the spot, and the flavors are totally out of this world. Click here for the Jamaican Ox Tail Cooking Recipe.
  3. Jamaican Curry GoatJamaican curried goat is a Jamaican classic. So many people order this meal, in Jamaican restaurants. To me one has to be “in the mood” to enjoy Jamaican curried goat. Click here for Jamaican Curried Goat Cooking Recipe.
  4. Jamaican Jerk Chicken – This is another Jamaican food Classic. Those who love hot and spicy food, tend to request Jamaican Jerk20130715-jerk-chicken-final-food-lab-38 Chicken, be sure to by the special Jamaican Jerk Seasoning. I would shy away from this one if its your first time. I tried to cook it once, and totally over did the Jerk seasoning. I couldn’t taste the food. Click her for Jamaican Jerk chicken cooking recipe.
  5. Ackee and Salt Fish – Ackee and Saltfish is another Jamaican food Classic. Ackee and Saltfish is typically eaten at breakfast time by Jamaican people, however it is so good that we eat it any time of day. But again, you sort of have to be in the mood  to really enjoy Ackee and Saltfish. It tastes delicious, is a little salty, but in a good way. If its your first time cooking a Jamaican meal. I would shy away from this one,  until you get to practice it a few times on your own. Jamaican Ackee and Saltfish Cooking  Recipe.

If you want my opinion…if it’s your first time cooking Jamaican food, I would try cooking the Jamaican stew chicken. Do a run through before that special day, then on that day you will be more prepared.

 

More tips to Cook for your Jamaican Man

  1. Hot foodMake sure the food is piping hot– Jamaicans don’t like food that is kind of hot they like it piping hot.
  2. Try to serve food that is heavy – Jamaicans people are used to eating food that is not only flavorful but also heavy. So, that when we eat it, we don’t feel hungry after wards
    Don’t be afraid to use some pepper and some spices– I think a lot of Jamaicans expect food to be spicy and have some pepper in it. Serve the hot sauce bottle “on the side”…this is common Jamaican culture.
  3. Include a fresh leafy Salad – I don’t know why, Jamaicans love having Fresh leafy greens on their dinner plate. I think fresh salad goes well with all the spices that people are used to eating in the Caribbean.  In case you were wondering Jamaicans typically like french dressing with their salad or Ranch.
  4. Big cold tasty drink – In Jamaica many of the drinks are very cold jamaican drinkand very flavorful. Meant to cool you off and provide a little sweetness for the tongue. Give your Jamaican man a big tall cold tasty drink with his Jamaican food….He will love you for it. We are not picky about the type of Juice just as long as its cold…but…since you asked….Jamaicans  love to drink …pineapple Juice,  Orange Juice, Grape Juice, Lemonade
  5. A Large Serving is best! – I almost forgot…in Jamaican culture, to serve a Jamaican person a small plate of food is sort of disrespectful…It is always best to serve a large portion of food so that the person doesn’t have to say, “Can I have some more please?” So, be sure the food is high and wide on the plate. Very Important!!!
  6. Bring him his food In Jamaican culture it is common that the woman brings the man his food where ever he is. Yes, and that they may not enjoy a meal together. Jamaican women don’t take it personal. They Just get on with their duties. You may consider doing the same for your Jamaican man. But, just keep in mind if you do it once, he may expect it again and again.

Try some of these Jamaican Food Recipes Too:

Blessed. King Selassie I.

Rasta Books: Rasta Way of Life books

RASTA WAY OF LIFE BOOK LIFE AS A RASTA WOMAN BOOK
Rasta_Way_of_Life_Cover_for_Kindle

JAH RASTAFARI PRAYERS BOOK

HOW TO BECOME A RASTAFARIAN MAN BOOK

ITAL RASTA eCOOKBOOK

RASTA BIBLE BOOK

JAMAICAN MEN BOOK

 

life as a rasta woman

HOW TO BECOME A RASTA BOOK

RASTAFARI BELIEFS & PRINCIPLES BOOK

CONVERT TO RASTAFARI BOOK

AFRICAN  RASTA BOOK

JAMAICAN WOMEN

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Jamaican Dating Personals

[user-submitted-posts]

Young Affectionate Couple Relaxing on Beach

Jamaicans Dating white women & White men

Jamaicans are dating white men, and dating White women in large numbers. I think its beautiful! Our planet needs more inter-culture mingling. It calms ignorance, and lessens the possibility for hatred, prejudice and Racism.

Jamaican men & white women dating

A lot of Jamaican men are dating white women. I think they look beautiful as a couple and compliment eachother. People are vacationing more than ever now…so lots of white women and Jamaican men are having the opportunity to meet…

Why do Jamaican men date White Women!

Some People ask me, Why do Jamaican men date White Women?
Jamaican men date white women, because they find them attractive, fun to hang out with, and they like the chemistry that they have with white women. Thats it! Besides its not bodys’ business who are person is dating especially if you don’t know them.

Jamaican women & white men dating

black women white men

Lots of Jamaican Women are dating White men also. It works both ways. Some say there are 2 main reasons for this.
#1 Jamaican Black men are not really dating Jamaican black women any more, so there are a lot of Single Jamaican Black women living in Jamaica, and in the West.
#2 A lot of White men are very attracted to Jamaican women, so they fall in love.

White men are nice to Jamaican women
white men are very affecitone towards Jamaican Women
White men appreciate the curves and shape of the Jamaican Woman
White men are Physically and emotionally gentle and King to Jamaican Black Women

I love Jamaican men…

white women jamaican men

Perhaps you are a white woman who has thought to yourself, “I love Jamaican men,” where can I find one to date? Well, you can post a personals ad on “Jamaican Love.” A lot of Black Jamaican men want to meet and marry white women. Place my personals ad on Jamaicanlove.org now

Do Jamaican men like american women?

Yes Jamaican men do like American women very much! Jamaican men like women of all nationalities, black american women, white american women, Asian American Women. The reason is that, in Jamaica a lot of the men see a “foreign woman as being “special” so, they dream of dating and settling down with an American woman. Also in Jamaica we have people who are Jamaican of various nations. Join Jamaicanlove.org and share your personals ad with Jamaican men living in Jamaica, and the US.

Meet Jamaican Singles UK, Canada, US?

jamaican love
Meet Jamaican men, or meet Jamaican women. If you are a Jamaican, create your sinlge ad to meet a white woman or a white man today.

Post your Personals Ad on Jamaican Love!

Jamaicanlove.org Jamaicans mingle with those who Love them.

How to Date a Jamaican man the book (part 1)



sexy jamaican manHere is my book online for free “How to Date a Jamaican Man”

Jamaican People & Culture

Jamaican Culture is known all around the world. The Jamaican Culture, has become “Pop Culture”, and inspires many tourists to visit the Caribbean Island of Jamaica, year after year. Jamaican Culture has many components that make up its uniqueness. The Jamaican people, Jamaican music (Reggae) and Jamaican food are at the top of the list.

More components of Jamaican culture include the influence of Rastafari, The Religion of Christianity, some deeply rooted Jamaican Values, and African Culture and Tradition. All in all Jamaica is one of the most, if not the, most popular Island of the Caribbean.

Rastafari on Jamaican Culture

Rastafari is everywhere in Jamaica. Figuratively and literally. It is unfortunate that Jamaican friends of mine tell me that Rastafari is not highly regarded in Jamaica. I believe it comes down to the individual. When I visited Jamaica in February 2012, I felt respected as a Rastafari woman, as if my presence was appreciated. So everyone has his own opinion.

Rastafari has influenced…

• Reggae Music
• Jamaican Culture
• Jamaican Tourism

What is Rastafari?

Rastafari is a spirituality. It is an inborn concept. A way of life and set of principles that surround cleanliness and a love of The Almighty. For one reason or another Jah (God) has chosen to make his presence strongly known among the Jamaican people.

Rastafari has popularized Reggae music, and Jamaica, worldwide. We know this is true because Bob Marley, who was the biggest musician out of Jamaica, and one of the biggest musicians of the world, was Rastafari.

In Jamaica you will find much Red yellow and green wall murals, clothing, Flags, Street Signs, even cars. Red for the blood Shed of the African (Black) People, green for the agriculture of the African Land, and yellow for the sunshine that falls all over the Beautiful Continent of Africa. This combination is representative of The Spiritual Way of life Ras-Tafari. Rastafari and Jamaica run synonymous. Rastafari is Jamaica, Jamaica is Rastafari.

The Influence of Christianity

Many Jamaican men and women will tell you that they grew up as Christian. Going to Church on Sunday Morning is a common thing in Jamaican Households. Many Jamaicans can recite quotes from the Christian bible. Many Jamaican people are very devout Christians. Reading the bible each morning and each night. I know this is true for me. I truly believe that I found Ras Tafari through my devotion to Christianity. Therefor Christianity and Rastafari are viewed as related by some, but still entirely different, by others. Christianity has been an instrument of self-discipline, strength and love in the homes of many Jamaican families.

Show of Respect

Many people of Jamaica are very warm and Kind. Many of us put up a tough exterior, but many of us are very sweet and kind once you get to know us. Jamaicans like to deal with each other and others in a respectful, easy going, upfront way. Respect is such a big deal in Jamaican Culture, that this word on its own is often used in Salutation and Greetings. When dealing with Jamaicans, show respect, especially towards the elders. It is expected. The next paragraph explains how.

Saying “Hi”

Saying “hi” is a big deal in Jamaican Culture. The reason? The implications of not saying hi are all negative. If a person does not say “hi” They may be seen as
· Disrespectful
· Rude
· Putting their nose in the air

The consequences can be “out of this world.” I have lived it. For your own comfort, just be sure to great each and every single Jamaican person that you pass by on the street, with a “hello”, a “good morning”, a “good evening”, or “good afternoon.” If you do this, they will think of you in a bright beautiful light of love and kindness. If you don’t do this, you have just screwed yourself harder than you can imagine.

Keep Clean

Jamaicans are some of the cleanest people. Many Jamaicans shower daily, but some shower 2 times daily. When I am in Jamaica, I tend to shower twice daily, as well, just because it gets so hot.

· When it comes to cleanliness, Jamaicans take pride in…
· A clean and organized home and yard
· Proper and Regular Hygiene for the and body
· Clean and wrinkle free (ironed) clothes
· Clean home

I have met many Jamaican people whose homes smelled like cleaning supplies, so much so to the point where, they could be out away from their home, and they would have the scent of household cleaning products on their clothes.

Proper hygiene

Proper and regular hygiene habits are of the utmost importance if you want to get along with Jamaican people, especially your Jamaican man’s Mother. This means…

· Showering daily (and hand washing your underwear in the shower)
· Brushing your teeth after each meal, maintaining fresh breath, so as not to be offensive
· Changing your bed sheets once a week

Please wash your panty!

If you are a woman who does not hand wash her underwear by hand while she is in the shower, and then hang it up to dry for everybody else within the household to see it, once they have entered the bathroom, you may be called “nasty.” Jamaicans have the mindset that a woman’s underwear is a very personal undergarment, which is full of sweat and vaginal fluids. Many of us feel that such an item must not be left sitting to “simmer” for any length of time, and that not washing your underwear the same time you take it off is just “laziness” and “nastiness” on the woman’s part. Please wash your panty the minute you take it off. It sounds silly but Jamaicans take this very seriously.

Make sure your clothes are clean

Wearing clean clothes is a very important part of Jamaican culture. It sounds silly that I mention it right. Well, Jamaicans take this very seriously. The way they handle a person who they feel is not wearing clean clothes is not to tell the person themselves, but to gossip about the person behind their back instead. So, it is very important when dating a Jamaican man, to wear clean clothes. If all your clothes are dirty, and the one item you have left that’s clean is your ugliest outfit from the 80s that you use to wear to go clubbing… put it on! Do not put on the dirty one.

Space and Privacy

cropped-jamaica.pngIn Jamaican Culture it is very important to give all family members, their own space and privacy. Sometimes a person needs time to think or to clear the mind. Nobody wants somebody nagging them when they need some time alone, especially a Jamaican man. A Jamaican man needs time alone from his woman to do the things that he feels he needs to do at that time. Respect his space and for goodness sakes respect his privacy too. This means don’t go sneaking through his stuff behind his back. We Jamaicans don’t appreciate that type of behavior at all.


Bob Marley



Early life and career
bob marley

Robert Nesta Marley was born on February 6, 1945 on the farm of his maternal grandfather in Nine Mile, Saint Ann Parish, Jamaica. His parents are to Norval Sinclair Marley & Cedella Booker.[8] Norval Marley was a European-Jamaican of British heritage (Heather Marley once stated that he may have had distant Jewish Syrian ancestry).[9] Norval claimed to have been a captain in the Royal Marines, though at the time of his marriage to Cedella Booker, an African-Jamaican then 18 years old, he was employed as a plantation overseer.[10][11] Though Bob Marley was named Nesta Robert Marley, a Jamaican passport official would later reverse his first and middle names.[12][13] Norval provided financial support for his wife and child but seldom saw them as he was often away. Bob Marley attended Stepney Primary and Junior High School which serves the catchment area of Saint Ann.[14][15] In 1955, when Bob Marley was 10 years old, his father died of a heart attack at the age of 70.[16]
Marley and Neville Livingston (later known as Bunny Wailer) had been childhood friends in Nine Mile. They had started to play music together while at Stepney Primary and Junior High School.[17] Marley left Nine Mile with his mother when he was 12 and moved to Trenchtown, Kingston. Cedella Booker and Thadeus Livingston (Bunny Wailer’s father) had a daughter together whom they named Pearl, who was a younger sister to both Bob and Bunny. Now that Marley and Livingston were living together in the same house in Trenchtown, their musical explorations deepened to include the latest R&B from American radio stations whose broadcasts reached Jamaica, and the new Ska music.[18] The move to Trenchtown was proving to be fortuitous, and Marley soon found himself in a vocal group with Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Beverley Kelso and Junior Braithwaite. Joe Higgs, who was part of the successful vocal act Higgs and Wilson, resided on 3rd St., and his singing partner Roy Wilson had been raised by the grandmother of Junior Braithwaite. Higgs and Wilson would rehearse at the back of the houses between 2nd and 3rd Streets, and it wasn’t long before Marley (now residing on 2nd St), Junior Braithwaite and the others were congregating around this successful duo.[19] Marley and the others didn’t play any instruments at this time, and were more interested in being a vocal harmony group. Higgs was glad to help them develop their vocal harmonies, although more importantly, he had started to teach Marley how to play guitar — thereby creating the bedrock that would later allow Marley to construct some of the biggest-selling reggae songs in the history of the genre.[20][21]

Bob Marley and the Wailers

1962–1972: Early years
In February 1962, Marley recorded four songs, “Judge Not”, “One Cup of Coffee”, “Do You Still Love Me?” and “Terror”, at bob-marley

Federal Studio for local music producer Leslie Kong.[22] Three of the songs were released on Beverley’s with “One Cup of Coffee” being released under the pseudonym Bobby Martell.[23]
In 1963, Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso, and Cherry Smith were called The Teenagers. They later changed the name to The Wailing Rudeboys, then to The Wailing Wailers, at which point they were discovered by record producer Coxsone Dodd, and finally to The Wailers. Their single “Simmer Down” for the Coxsone label became a Jamaican #1 in February 1964 selling an estimated 70,000 copies.[24] The Wailers, now regularly recording for Studio One, found themselves working with established Jamaican musicians such as Ernest Ranglin (arranger “It Hurts To Be Alone”),[25] the keyboardist Jackie Mittoo and saxophonist Roland Alphonso. By 1966, Braithwaite, Kelso, and Smith had left The Wailers, leaving the core trio of Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, and Peter Tosh.[26]
In 1966, Marley married Rita Anderson, and moved near his mother’s residence in Wilmington, Delaware in the United States for a short time, during which he worked as a DuPont lab assistant and on the assembly line at a Chrysler plant, under the alias Donald Marley.[27]

Though raised as a Catholic, Marley became interested in Rastafarian beliefs in the 1960s, when away from his mother’s influence.[28] After returning to Jamaica Marley formally converted to Rastafari and began to grow dreadlocks. The Rastafarian proscription against cutting hair is based on the biblical Samson who as a Nazirite was expected to make certain religious vows including the ritual treatment of his hair as described in Chapter Six of the Book of Numbers:
All the days of the vow of his separation there shall no razor come upon his head: until the days be fulfilled, in the which he separateth himself unto the Lord, he shall be holy, and shall let the locks of the hair of his head grow.
After a financial disagreement with Dodd, Marley and his band teamed up with Lee “Scratch” Perry and his studio band, The Upsetters. Although the alliance lasted less than a year, they recorded what many consider The Wailers’ finest work. Marley and Perry split after a dispute regarding the assignment of recording rights, but they would remain friends and work together again.

Bob Marley’s flat in 1972 at 34 Ridgmount Gardens, Bloomsbury, London.
Between 1968 and 1972, Bob and Rita Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer re-cut some old tracks with JAD Records in Kingston and London in an attempt to commercialise The Wailers’ sound. Bunny later asserted that these songs “should never be released on an album … they were just demos for record companies to listen to”. In 1968, Bob and Rita visited songwriter Jimmy Norman at his apartment in the Bronx. Norman had written the extended lyrics for Kai Winding’s “Time Is on My Side” (covered by the Rolling Stones) and had also written for Johnny Nash and Jimi Hendrix.[29] A three-day jam session with Norman and others, including Norman’s co-writer Al Pyfrom, resulted in a 24-minute tape of Marley performing several of his own and Norman-Pyfrom’s compositions. This tape is, according to Reggae archivist Roger Steffens, rare in that it was influenced by pop rather than reggae, as part of an effort to break Marley into the American charts.[29] According to an article in The New York Times, Marley experimented on the tape with different sounds, adopting a doo-wop style on “Stay With Me” and “the slow love song style of 1960’s artists” on “Splish for My Splash”.[29] An artist yet to establish himself outside his native Jamaica, Marley lived in Ridgmount Gardens, Bloomsbury, during 1972.[30]

1972–1974: Move to Island Records

In 1972, Bob Marley signed with CBS Records in London and embarked on a UK tour with American soul singer Johnny Nash.[31] While in London the Wailers asked their road manager Brent Clarke to introduce them to Chris Blackwell who had licensed some of their Coxsone releases for his Island Records. The Wailers intended to discuss the royalties associated with these releases instead the meeting resulted in the offer of an advance of £4,000 to record an album.[32] Since Jimmy Cliff, Island’s top reggae star, had recently left the label, Blackwell was primed for a replacement. In Marley, Blackwell recognized the elements needed to snare the rock audience: “I was dealing with rock music, which was really rebel music. I felt that would really be the way to break Jamaican music. But you needed someone who could be that image. When Bob walked in he really was that image.”[33] The Wailers returned to Jamaica to record at Harry J’s in Kingston which resulted in the album Catch a Fire.
Primarily recorded on an eight-track Catch a Fire marked the first time a reggae band had access to a state-of-the-art studio and were accorded the same care as their rock ‘n’ roll peers.[33] Blackwell desired to create “more of a drifting, hypnotic-type feel than a reggae rhythm”,[34] and restructured Marley’s mixes and arrangements. Marley travelled to London to supervise Blackwell’s overdubbing of the album which included tempering the mix from the bass-heavy sound of Jamaican music and omitting two tracks.[33]

The Wailers’ first album for Island, Catch a Fire, was released worldwide in April 1973, packaged like a rock record with a unique Zippo lighter lift-top. Initially selling 14,000 units, it didn’t make Marley a star, but received a positive critical reception.[33] It was followed later that year by the album Burnin’ which included the song “I Shot the Sheriff”. Eric Clapton was given the album by his guitarist George Terry in the hope that he would enjoy it.[35] Clapton was suitably impressed and chose to record a cover version of “I Shot the Sheriff” which became his first US hit since “Layla” two years earlier and reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on 14 September 1974.[36] Many Jamaicans were not keen on the new reggae sound on Catch a Fire, but the Trenchtown style of Burnin found fans across both reggae and rock audiences.[33]
During this period, Blackwell gifted his Kingston residence and company headquarters at 56 Hope Road (then known as Island House) to Marley. Housing Tuff Gong Studios, the property became not only Marley’s office, but also his home.[33]
The Wailers were scheduled to open seventeen shows in the US for Sly and the Family Stone. After four shows, the band was fired because they were more popular than the acts they were opening for.[37] The Wailers broke up in 1974 with each of the three main members pursuing solo careers. The reason for the breakup is shrouded in conjecture; some believe that there were disagreements amongst Bunny, Peter, and Bob concerning performances, while others claim that Bunny and Peter simply preferred solo work.

1974–1976: Line-up changes and shooting

Bob-marley-wailers-crystal-palace

Bob Marley & The Wailers live at Crystal Palace Park during the Uprising Tour
Despite the break-up, Marley continued recording as “Bob Marley & The Wailers”. His new backing band included brothers Carlton and Aston “Family Man” Barrett on drums and bass respectively, Junior Marvin and Al Anderson on lead guitar, Tyrone Downie and Earl “Wya” Lindo on keyboards, and Alvin “Seeco” Patterson on percussion. The “I Threes”, consisting of Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths, and Marley’s wife, Rita, provided backing vocals. In 1975, Marley had his international breakthrough with his first hit outside Jamaica, “No Woman, No Cry”, from the Natty Dread album.[38] This was followed by his breakthrough album in the United States, Rastaman Vibration (1976), which reached the Top 50 of the Billboard Soul Charts.[39]
On 3 December 1976, two days before “Smile Jamaica”, a free concert organised by the Jamaican Prime Minister Michael Manley in an attempt to ease tension between two warring political groups, Marley, his wife, and manager Don Taylor were wounded in an assault by unknown gunmen inside Marley’s home. Taylor and Marley’s wife sustained serious injuries, but later made full recoveries. Bob Marley received minor wounds in the chest and arm.[40] The attempt on his life was thought to have been politically motivated, as many felt the concert was really a support rally for Manley. Nonetheless, the concert proceeded, and an injured Marley performed as scheduled, two days after the attempt. When asked why, Marley responded, “The people who are trying to make this world worse aren’t taking a day off. How can I?” The members of the group Zap Pow played as Bob Marley’s backup band before a festival crowd of 80,000 while members of The Wailers were still missing or in hiding.[41][42] Marley left Jamaica at the end of 1976, and after a month-long “recovery and writing” sojourn at the site of Chris Blackwell’s Compass Point Studios in Nassau, Bahamas, arrived in England, where he spent two years in self-imposed exile.

1977–1978: Relocation to England
Marley performing in Dalymount Park in the late 1970s
Whilst in England, he recorded the albums Exodus and Kaya. Exodus stayed on the British album charts for fifty-six consecutive weeks. It included four UK hit singles: “Exodus”, “Waiting in Vain”, “Jamming”, and “One Love” (a rendition of Curtis Mayfield’s hit, “People Get Ready”). During his time in London, he was arrested and received a conviction for possession of a small quantity of cannabis.[43] In 1978, Marley returned to Jamaica and performed at another political concert, the One Love Peace Concert, again in an effort to calm warring parties. Near the end of the performance, by Marley’s request, Michael Manley (leader of then-ruling People’s National Party) and his political rival Edward Seaga (leader of the opposing Jamaica Labour Party), joined each other on stage and shook hands.[44]
Under the name Bob Marley and the Wailers eleven albums were released, four live albums and seven studio albums. The releases included Babylon by Bus, a double live album with thirteen tracks, were released in 1978 and received critical acclaim. This album, and specifically the final track “Jamming” with the audience in a frenzy, captured the intensity of Marley’s live performances.[45]
“Marley wasn’t singing about how peace could come easily to the World but rather how hell on Earth comes too easily to too many. His songs were his memories; he had lived with the wretched, he had seen the downpressors and those whom they pressed down.”

– Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone[46]
1979–1981: Later years

bob marley2

Survival, a defiant and politically charged album, was released in 1979. Tracks such as “Zimbabwe”, “Africa Unite”, “Wake Up and Live”, and “Survival” reflected Marley’s support for the struggles of Africans. His appearance at the Amandla Festival in Boston in July 1979 showed his strong opposition to South African apartheid, which he already had shown in his song “War” in 1976. In early 1980, he was invited to perform at the 17 April celebration of Zimbabwe’s Independence Day. Uprising (1980) was Bob Marley’s final studio album, and is one of his most religious productions; it includes “Redemption Song” and “Forever Loving Jah”.[47] Confrontation, released posthumously in 1983, contained unreleased material recorded during Marley’s lifetime, including the hit “Buffalo Soldier” and new mixes of singles previously only available in Jamaica.[48]