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7 Tips for becoming a new Rasta



  1. Stay open-minded – As a new Rastafari, it is important to bob-marleystay open-minded. There are many people, books, and much history to learn from. Never assume you “know all there is to know” about Rastafari…this is the point where you may stop learning.
  2. Rastafari is not a religion – Never Refer to Rastafari as a Religion. Rasta refers to Rastafari as “a faith” “a Livity ” a meditation” “a spirituality” “a way of Life” but never a Religion. Religion is of man, Rastafari comes from Jah.
  3. Accept your self as Growing –  Rastafari is something you will embrace your whole life. The more you love Jah, and his creations, the more his heart grows in yours. Know that to “grow” as a Rasta, is a beautiful process. accept it, embrace it,  and enjoy it…continuously.
  4. Love Jah! – Just love Jah and all things will fall into place through him. Jah is love!
  5. Love The African Image African woman, African man, rasta empressAfrican child, are all beauties of Rastafari.  Rasta knows the first man and woman were created in Ethiopia Africa. We see beauty in the image of the African human.
  6. Listen to “Rastafari Reggae Music” –  Rastafari only listen to Rastafari Reggae music. Why? We know this music is clean…and…we can here the word of Jah in this music.  You too should listen to “Jah” music.


  7. Know you are being Tested!

    – As soon as you embrace the Rastafari Livity you notice yourself being “tested”…left, right and center. It’s just that Satan  is “vex” because you have chosen to live in truth and walk in the light of Jah. its normal, keep trodding on the high rod. Jah is there. Check out my blog post on traditional Jamaican Foods.

Love & Blessings to All. King Selassie I.

3 Things a Jamaican man must have (part 3)

 

3 Things a Jamaican man must have!

Jamaican men Characteristics – my 7 tips for becoming a new Rastafari

List of 10 things Jamaican men like a a woman – 10 Best Jamaican food dishes

jamaican men-

A Jamaican man will need these things to a greater or lesser degree, but generally speaking these are 3 things every Jamaican man needs. If he doesn’t have these things…he might become irritated and irrational.

#1 Good Jamaican Food to eat for his body

Good Healthy Jamaican Food is a very important part of a Jamaican man’s best jamaican foodhappiness and health. Without his home cooked Jamaican fuel, He may become cranky and complain of feeling “weak.”. A Jamaican man operates best when he can rest assured he can hang with the other men and know he’s got the strength and stamina that he should as a true Jamaican Warrior. To keep his health at its prime he will need to regularly eat healthy hearty good Jamaican Food.

#2 Intimate time with his woman

jamaican loveGood Healthy Intimate time is at the top of the List for any virile Jamaican man. A Jamaican man likes to feel that he can make a woman happy with his manhood. He also needs to have s*x to balance his mind and make him feel relaxed. Many Jamaican men need to have lots of (relatively speaking) s*x because he somehow feels that having s*x validates him as a man. Not only that, Jamaican men and a woman are like “hand in glove.” A Jamaican man loves the attention and affections of females. This may be the reason why it is so commonly known that many Jamaican men (who live in Jamaica) tend to have “a woman on the side.”

#3 Time with buddies for laughter and reasoning

Many Jamaican men love their time with their male friends. They like to play jamaican men with friendsdominos, sip on some Guinness or some Heineken, and just shoot the breeze. If you want your Jamaican man to be happy, to spend time with his buddies is a must. He may come home late, and “red out” from smoking some good Marijuana, or drunk from all the drinking, but just know, his behavior is normal. The truth is, many Jamaican men, really are just a ” little boy” at heart.

21 things about dating a jamaican man

things jamaican men like in a womanRead my Jamaican men Characteristics, and my How to cook for a Jamaican man

  1. eBook about Jamaican men 21 Things!
  2. Learn to Speak Jamaican Patois
  3. Read Rasta Way of Life eBook (5 Star Rating)
  4. Information about Jamaican Women
  5. Life as a Rasta Woman eBook
  6. Read Rastafari Beliefs and Principles Book

Bob Marley



Early life and career
bob marley

Robert Nesta Marley was born on February 6, 1945 on the farm of his maternal grandfather in Nine Mile, Saint Ann Parish, Jamaica. His parents are to Norval Sinclair Marley & Cedella Booker.[8] Norval Marley was a European-Jamaican of British heritage (Heather Marley once stated that he may have had distant Jewish Syrian ancestry).[9] Norval claimed to have been a captain in the Royal Marines, though at the time of his marriage to Cedella Booker, an African-Jamaican then 18 years old, he was employed as a plantation overseer.[10][11] Though Bob Marley was named Nesta Robert Marley, a Jamaican passport official would later reverse his first and middle names.[12][13] Norval provided financial support for his wife and child but seldom saw them as he was often away. Bob Marley attended Stepney Primary and Junior High School which serves the catchment area of Saint Ann.[14][15] In 1955, when Bob Marley was 10 years old, his father died of a heart attack at the age of 70.[16]
Marley and Neville Livingston (later known as Bunny Wailer) had been childhood friends in Nine Mile. They had started to play music together while at Stepney Primary and Junior High School.[17] Marley left Nine Mile with his mother when he was 12 and moved to Trenchtown, Kingston. Cedella Booker and Thadeus Livingston (Bunny Wailer’s father) had a daughter together whom they named Pearl, who was a younger sister to both Bob and Bunny. Now that Marley and Livingston were living together in the same house in Trenchtown, their musical explorations deepened to include the latest R&B from American radio stations whose broadcasts reached Jamaica, and the new Ska music.[18] The move to Trenchtown was proving to be fortuitous, and Marley soon found himself in a vocal group with Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Beverley Kelso and Junior Braithwaite. Joe Higgs, who was part of the successful vocal act Higgs and Wilson, resided on 3rd St., and his singing partner Roy Wilson had been raised by the grandmother of Junior Braithwaite. Higgs and Wilson would rehearse at the back of the houses between 2nd and 3rd Streets, and it wasn’t long before Marley (now residing on 2nd St), Junior Braithwaite and the others were congregating around this successful duo.[19] Marley and the others didn’t play any instruments at this time, and were more interested in being a vocal harmony group. Higgs was glad to help them develop their vocal harmonies, although more importantly, he had started to teach Marley how to play guitar — thereby creating the bedrock that would later allow Marley to construct some of the biggest-selling reggae songs in the history of the genre.[20][21]

Bob Marley and the Wailers

1962–1972: Early years
In February 1962, Marley recorded four songs, “Judge Not”, “One Cup of Coffee”, “Do You Still Love Me?” and “Terror”, at bob-marley

Federal Studio for local music producer Leslie Kong.[22] Three of the songs were released on Beverley’s with “One Cup of Coffee” being released under the pseudonym Bobby Martell.[23]
In 1963, Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Junior Braithwaite, Beverley Kelso, and Cherry Smith were called The Teenagers. They later changed the name to The Wailing Rudeboys, then to The Wailing Wailers, at which point they were discovered by record producer Coxsone Dodd, and finally to The Wailers. Their single “Simmer Down” for the Coxsone label became a Jamaican #1 in February 1964 selling an estimated 70,000 copies.[24] The Wailers, now regularly recording for Studio One, found themselves working with established Jamaican musicians such as Ernest Ranglin (arranger “It Hurts To Be Alone”),[25] the keyboardist Jackie Mittoo and saxophonist Roland Alphonso. By 1966, Braithwaite, Kelso, and Smith had left The Wailers, leaving the core trio of Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, and Peter Tosh.[26]
In 1966, Marley married Rita Anderson, and moved near his mother’s residence in Wilmington, Delaware in the United States for a short time, during which he worked as a DuPont lab assistant and on the assembly line at a Chrysler plant, under the alias Donald Marley.[27]

Though raised as a Catholic, Marley became interested in Rastafarian beliefs in the 1960s, when away from his mother’s influence.[28] After returning to Jamaica Marley formally converted to Rastafari and began to grow dreadlocks. The Rastafarian proscription against cutting hair is based on the biblical Samson who as a Nazirite was expected to make certain religious vows including the ritual treatment of his hair as described in Chapter Six of the Book of Numbers:
All the days of the vow of his separation there shall no razor come upon his head: until the days be fulfilled, in the which he separateth himself unto the Lord, he shall be holy, and shall let the locks of the hair of his head grow.
After a financial disagreement with Dodd, Marley and his band teamed up with Lee “Scratch” Perry and his studio band, The Upsetters. Although the alliance lasted less than a year, they recorded what many consider The Wailers’ finest work. Marley and Perry split after a dispute regarding the assignment of recording rights, but they would remain friends and work together again.

Bob Marley’s flat in 1972 at 34 Ridgmount Gardens, Bloomsbury, London.
Between 1968 and 1972, Bob and Rita Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer re-cut some old tracks with JAD Records in Kingston and London in an attempt to commercialise The Wailers’ sound. Bunny later asserted that these songs “should never be released on an album … they were just demos for record companies to listen to”. In 1968, Bob and Rita visited songwriter Jimmy Norman at his apartment in the Bronx. Norman had written the extended lyrics for Kai Winding’s “Time Is on My Side” (covered by the Rolling Stones) and had also written for Johnny Nash and Jimi Hendrix.[29] A three-day jam session with Norman and others, including Norman’s co-writer Al Pyfrom, resulted in a 24-minute tape of Marley performing several of his own and Norman-Pyfrom’s compositions. This tape is, according to Reggae archivist Roger Steffens, rare in that it was influenced by pop rather than reggae, as part of an effort to break Marley into the American charts.[29] According to an article in The New York Times, Marley experimented on the tape with different sounds, adopting a doo-wop style on “Stay With Me” and “the slow love song style of 1960’s artists” on “Splish for My Splash”.[29] An artist yet to establish himself outside his native Jamaica, Marley lived in Ridgmount Gardens, Bloomsbury, during 1972.[30]

1972–1974: Move to Island Records

In 1972, Bob Marley signed with CBS Records in London and embarked on a UK tour with American soul singer Johnny Nash.[31] While in London the Wailers asked their road manager Brent Clarke to introduce them to Chris Blackwell who had licensed some of their Coxsone releases for his Island Records. The Wailers intended to discuss the royalties associated with these releases instead the meeting resulted in the offer of an advance of £4,000 to record an album.[32] Since Jimmy Cliff, Island’s top reggae star, had recently left the label, Blackwell was primed for a replacement. In Marley, Blackwell recognized the elements needed to snare the rock audience: “I was dealing with rock music, which was really rebel music. I felt that would really be the way to break Jamaican music. But you needed someone who could be that image. When Bob walked in he really was that image.”[33] The Wailers returned to Jamaica to record at Harry J’s in Kingston which resulted in the album Catch a Fire.
Primarily recorded on an eight-track Catch a Fire marked the first time a reggae band had access to a state-of-the-art studio and were accorded the same care as their rock ‘n’ roll peers.[33] Blackwell desired to create “more of a drifting, hypnotic-type feel than a reggae rhythm”,[34] and restructured Marley’s mixes and arrangements. Marley travelled to London to supervise Blackwell’s overdubbing of the album which included tempering the mix from the bass-heavy sound of Jamaican music and omitting two tracks.[33]

The Wailers’ first album for Island, Catch a Fire, was released worldwide in April 1973, packaged like a rock record with a unique Zippo lighter lift-top. Initially selling 14,000 units, it didn’t make Marley a star, but received a positive critical reception.[33] It was followed later that year by the album Burnin’ which included the song “I Shot the Sheriff”. Eric Clapton was given the album by his guitarist George Terry in the hope that he would enjoy it.[35] Clapton was suitably impressed and chose to record a cover version of “I Shot the Sheriff” which became his first US hit since “Layla” two years earlier and reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on 14 September 1974.[36] Many Jamaicans were not keen on the new reggae sound on Catch a Fire, but the Trenchtown style of Burnin found fans across both reggae and rock audiences.[33]
During this period, Blackwell gifted his Kingston residence and company headquarters at 56 Hope Road (then known as Island House) to Marley. Housing Tuff Gong Studios, the property became not only Marley’s office, but also his home.[33]
The Wailers were scheduled to open seventeen shows in the US for Sly and the Family Stone. After four shows, the band was fired because they were more popular than the acts they were opening for.[37] The Wailers broke up in 1974 with each of the three main members pursuing solo careers. The reason for the breakup is shrouded in conjecture; some believe that there were disagreements amongst Bunny, Peter, and Bob concerning performances, while others claim that Bunny and Peter simply preferred solo work.

1974–1976: Line-up changes and shooting

Bob-marley-wailers-crystal-palace

Bob Marley & The Wailers live at Crystal Palace Park during the Uprising Tour
Despite the break-up, Marley continued recording as “Bob Marley & The Wailers”. His new backing band included brothers Carlton and Aston “Family Man” Barrett on drums and bass respectively, Junior Marvin and Al Anderson on lead guitar, Tyrone Downie and Earl “Wya” Lindo on keyboards, and Alvin “Seeco” Patterson on percussion. The “I Threes”, consisting of Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths, and Marley’s wife, Rita, provided backing vocals. In 1975, Marley had his international breakthrough with his first hit outside Jamaica, “No Woman, No Cry”, from the Natty Dread album.[38] This was followed by his breakthrough album in the United States, Rastaman Vibration (1976), which reached the Top 50 of the Billboard Soul Charts.[39]
On 3 December 1976, two days before “Smile Jamaica”, a free concert organised by the Jamaican Prime Minister Michael Manley in an attempt to ease tension between two warring political groups, Marley, his wife, and manager Don Taylor were wounded in an assault by unknown gunmen inside Marley’s home. Taylor and Marley’s wife sustained serious injuries, but later made full recoveries. Bob Marley received minor wounds in the chest and arm.[40] The attempt on his life was thought to have been politically motivated, as many felt the concert was really a support rally for Manley. Nonetheless, the concert proceeded, and an injured Marley performed as scheduled, two days after the attempt. When asked why, Marley responded, “The people who are trying to make this world worse aren’t taking a day off. How can I?” The members of the group Zap Pow played as Bob Marley’s backup band before a festival crowd of 80,000 while members of The Wailers were still missing or in hiding.[41][42] Marley left Jamaica at the end of 1976, and after a month-long “recovery and writing” sojourn at the site of Chris Blackwell’s Compass Point Studios in Nassau, Bahamas, arrived in England, where he spent two years in self-imposed exile.

1977–1978: Relocation to England
Marley performing in Dalymount Park in the late 1970s
Whilst in England, he recorded the albums Exodus and Kaya. Exodus stayed on the British album charts for fifty-six consecutive weeks. It included four UK hit singles: “Exodus”, “Waiting in Vain”, “Jamming”, and “One Love” (a rendition of Curtis Mayfield’s hit, “People Get Ready”). During his time in London, he was arrested and received a conviction for possession of a small quantity of cannabis.[43] In 1978, Marley returned to Jamaica and performed at another political concert, the One Love Peace Concert, again in an effort to calm warring parties. Near the end of the performance, by Marley’s request, Michael Manley (leader of then-ruling People’s National Party) and his political rival Edward Seaga (leader of the opposing Jamaica Labour Party), joined each other on stage and shook hands.[44]
Under the name Bob Marley and the Wailers eleven albums were released, four live albums and seven studio albums. The releases included Babylon by Bus, a double live album with thirteen tracks, were released in 1978 and received critical acclaim. This album, and specifically the final track “Jamming” with the audience in a frenzy, captured the intensity of Marley’s live performances.[45]
“Marley wasn’t singing about how peace could come easily to the World but rather how hell on Earth comes too easily to too many. His songs were his memories; he had lived with the wretched, he had seen the downpressors and those whom they pressed down.”

– Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone[46]
1979–1981: Later years

bob marley2

Survival, a defiant and politically charged album, was released in 1979. Tracks such as “Zimbabwe”, “Africa Unite”, “Wake Up and Live”, and “Survival” reflected Marley’s support for the struggles of Africans. His appearance at the Amandla Festival in Boston in July 1979 showed his strong opposition to South African apartheid, which he already had shown in his song “War” in 1976. In early 1980, he was invited to perform at the 17 April celebration of Zimbabwe’s Independence Day. Uprising (1980) was Bob Marley’s final studio album, and is one of his most religious productions; it includes “Redemption Song” and “Forever Loving Jah”.[47] Confrontation, released posthumously in 1983, contained unreleased material recorded during Marley’s lifetime, including the hit “Buffalo Soldier” and new mixes of singles previously only available in Jamaica.[48]

8 tips on dating a Jamaican man



  1. Show Respect to for his MotherIn Jamaican Culture respect for the mans Mother is so important. Never be disrespectful, always say “hi,” when you enter her home and make sure to say “bye” when you are leaving. Be sure to buy her a card for her birthday and Mothers day, otherwise you will be considered “rude” and “disrespectful.” Just so you know. If you do these things, you will be praised, and ask about.
  2. Don’t share too much personal information right awaySome jamaican man white womanJamaican men have Negative motives for why they may want your personal information. Just take your time with your stats. If I were you I would just lie to him for the first 3 months, and see where the relationship is going first. I am talking about your real last name, date of birth, and your address. Just take your time. If you were meant to be together you will be together 6 months from now.
  3. Make sure he is sincere – A Jamaican man may take an interest in your for any number of reasons. Only time will tell if he is really interested in your or something you can provide for him. Just keep it in the back of your mind that he may not be sincere, and remember that some Jamaican men love like children…in the moment, loving who ever is around. Just so you know. Read how to become a rasta. 
  4. Give him his space! – This is very important in Jamaican Culture. If you do not give a Jamaican man his space, he can become irritable. You may find him swearing at you and not showing you love, pulling away rather than closer. He just needs his own space and time alone. Many Jamaican women are like this too. Its nothing personal.jamaican-men
  5. Always keep your body fresh & clean! – Wash your a*s please! Jamaican men do not tolerate “dirtyness.”I know certain cultures don’t take it so serious, but to a Jamaican man, cleanliness is well, as they say, “next to Godliness.” Make sure you shower everyday and wash those creases! Yes I said it…creases!
  6. Don’t take his sh*t! – Don’t take crap from him. In fact if your Jamaican man starts dishing out trash talk early, or physical abuse, leave him..! It’s a downward spiral from there…trust me!
  7. Don’t be baby mama #4 – Many women fall so head over heals in love with their Jamaican guy that they think they are somehow different from baby Mama number 3,2, and 1. They think they can change him…they think, I am better than they were…stop kidding your self. Take some time, if he is really meant to be your man, he will be there with our without you becoming baby mama Number 4.
  8. Don’t assume you are “special…” – Just because he has sex with you, introduces you to his Mom, and tells you how much he wants to be with you, don’t assume you are special. A lot of women who are unfamiliar with Jamaican Culture, assume that these things mean you are special. A Jamaican man knows what to say to women, They are blessed in this sense. Take time, test him, know for sure you are special on his list, by how he treats you, is he patient with you? Will he do anything you ask of him? Test him to know!


Are you dating a Jamaican man living in Jamaica? Do you live abroad? Read 21 things about dating a Jamaican man.
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